High Court Orders Government to Facilitate Copyright Tribunal in PERAK Case against KAMP and PRiSK

pub kenya perak

In a judgment delivered recently, the High Court in the case of Republic v Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP) & 3 others Ex- Parte Pubs, Entertainment and Restaurants Association of Kenya (PERAK) [2014] eKLR has ordered the State to set up the Competent Authority established under the Copyright Act to hear and determine the dispute between PERAK and the related rights collective management organisations KAMP and PRiSK with respect to the latter’s tariffs for communication to the public.

As many may know, the Pubs, Entertainment and Restaurants Association of Kenya (PERAK) is the largest single entity representing owners and managers of the major restaurants, pubs and entertainment venues in Kenya. PERAK is registered under the Societies Act as a welfare Organization and its main objective is to bring together operators with a view of resolving common problems in the hospitality industry, developing a code of conduct for its members, engage in social responsibility activities and generally to help members comply with various regulations governing the hospitality industry.

The gist of the PERAK’s judicial review action is summarised in the following three orders which were sought from the court, namely:-

“1. That this Honourable Court be pleased to grant an order of prohibition to prohibit the 1st and 2nd Respondents from arbitrarily imposing and collecting high tariffs/license fees and other levies from the Applicant’s members’ business premises using a wrong tariff structure and generally harassing, intimidating and confiscating their business equipment throughout the Republic of Kenya.
2. That this Honourable Court be pleased to grant an order of mandamus compelling and directing the 3rd and 4th Respondents to hear and determine the dispute between the Applicant and the 1st and 2nd Respondents in relation to the high license fees charged and /or tariffs charged/levied using a wrong tariff structure by the 1st and 2nd Respondents.
3. The costs of this Application be provided for.”

In the court’s judgment, PERAK succeeded to prove that it had locus standi to institute proceedings on behalf of its members in addition to order no. 2. However PERAK was unsuccessful on order no. 1. With respect to order no. 3, the court declined to make any order as to costs.

Comment:

This blogger is surprised by PERAK’s poor form in mounting its judicial review suit against KAMP and PRiSK. This was clearly manifest from several unsubstantiated allegations, inaccurate and outrightly false statements of the provisions of the law by PERAK.

The most significance of this judgment can be found in the last four paragraghs where the court examines whether the government can and should be compelled to give effect to section 48 of the Copyright Act. On numerous occasions (see some examples here, here, here and here) this blogger has emphasised the need for Kenya to immediately operationalise the Competent Authority aka the Copyright Tribunal which is established under the Copyright Act to hear and determine disputes between users and CMOs.

Therefore this blogger is elated that the High Court has seized the opportunity to state clearly that the Government, in particular the Office of the Attorney General and Department of Justice can no longer rely on the same old excuses as reasons for not facilitating the operations of the Competent Authority.

To quote the court:

“The only reason advanced by the Kenya Copyright Board why the Competent Authority cannot fulfil its said statutory duty is that the Competent Authority is yet to be operationalized owing to budgetary and administrative challenges and hence the same is not functional. Article 47(1) of the Constitution provides that every person has the right to administrative action that is expeditious, efficient, lawful, reasonable and procedurally fair. Article 21(1) of the Constitution on the other hand provides that it is a fundamental duty of the State and every State organ to observe, respect, protect, promote and fulfil the rights and fundamental freedoms in the Bill of Rights. It is therefore upon the State to facilitate the Competent Authority so that it can undertake its statutory duties. To fail to do so amounts to abdication of the Constitutional duties imposed upon the State and in applying a provision of the Bill of Rights this Court is enjoined by Article 20(3)(b) of the Constitution to adopt the interpretation that most favours the enforcement of a right or fundamental freedom.
Adopting the said approach, this Court is not satisfied that the reason advanced by the Kenya Copyright Board warrants the state being absolved from the performance of its statutory duties taking into account the fact that the Competent Authority is already in the office.”

The ball is therefore squarely in the government’s court to operationalise the Competent Authority failing with PERAK will be at liberty to return to court for contempt orders against the Kenya Copyright Board.

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