New Regulations Prohibit Registered Trade Marks as Company Names – Problem?

Companies Registry at Office of Attorney General Sheria House Nairobi by Business Daily

In an earlier post here, this blogger reported that Kenya finally enacted a new and comprehensive company law legislation. The Companies Act 2015 contains an express provision on prohibited names which states that the Registrar of Companies has the discretion not to register a company if the name applied for reservation is offensive or undesirable.

The Act states that the criteria to be used by the Registrar to determine whether a particular name is offensive or undesirable shall be prescribed by the regulations. This blogger is now pleased to report that the regulations in question have been published in the Kenya Gazette. From an intellectual property (IP) perspective, it is notable that the regulations contain a provision intended to provide greater certainty in situations where a company is registered using a name that is identical to a registered trade mark belonging to a third party.

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Kenya Copyright Board Suggests Guernsey Approach to Image Rights Protection

Kenya Copyright Board Publication Copyright News Issue 18 2015 Cover

The most recent edition of Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) newsletter (cover pictured above) focuses on photography and image rights. A copy of the full Issue 18 is available here.

In the lead article starting on page 4 by KECOBO Executive Director, a compelling case is made in favour of specific legal protection of image rights, particularly in the case of celebrities. The article uses the oft-cited case of Dennis Oliech v. EABL (previously discussed here) to illustrate the limitations of existing intellectual property (IP) regimes in cases of commercial appropriation of one’s personality and/or image.

The article reads in part as follows:

“The use of images and personality rights is gaining currency and there is need to ensure that the same is well regulated and third parties do not take undue advantage of the commercialisation of the same. Guernsey provides a good example and maybe we should follow suit.”

This view from the Copyright Office begs the question: will Kenya be better off with a specific law on image rights like Guernsey? This blogger argues that the answer must be “No”.

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Comments on the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions Bill, 2015

Call for Submission of Memoranda - National Assembly - TK Bill 2015 Kenya

This blogger has learnt that the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions Bill, 2015 has undergone Second Reading at the National Assembly as it nears enactment as a law in Kenya.

Other than the detailed commentary sent out last month by Prof. John Harrington and Dr. Lotte Hughes on the Bill, there has been no other substantive reactions or comments on the Bill excluding this recent piece on an earlier draft of the Bill.

A copy of the Bill tabled in Parliament is available here.

The commentary and response by Harrington and Hughes on the Bill reads in part:

“…the bill freely mixes ideas from conventional IP protection, sui generis regimes for TK and TCEs and the 2003 UNESCO Convention on the Safeguarding of the Intangible Heritage without trying to harmonise them or limit problematic consequences from the different approaches taken. The resulting system of protection may have some unintended consequences.”

What follows are some of this blogger’s thoughts on the Bill including some of the same issues raised by Harrington and Hughes.

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High Court Orders Stay in “KENYA BOYS CHOIR” Trade Mark Dispute

Kenyan Boys Choir Boys Choir Kenya Twitter Account Verified

Earlier this year, we reported here this ruling: In the Matter of Trade Mark No. KE/T/2010/67586 “KENYA BOYS CHOIR” (WORDS) in Classes 16 and 41 in the Name of Joseph Muyale Inzai and Expungement Proceedings Thereto by Kenyan Boys Choir by the Assistant Registrar of Trade Marks at the Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI).
In this case, one Joseph Muyale Inzai filed an application to register his trade mark “KENYA BOYS CHOIR” (WORDS) before the Registrar of Trade Marks in classes 16 and 41 of the Nice Classification. The mark was approved, published and thereafter entered in the Register of Trade Marks in 2010.

In the same year, Members of a choir known as Kenyan Boys Choir obtained registration of their business names “THE KENYAN BOYS CHOIR” and “THE BOYS CHOIR OF KENYA” under the Registration of Business Names Act. These Members of the Kenyan Boys Choir filed an application for expungement of Inzai’s mark claiming that they were aggrieved by the entry of the mark for various reasons including that they were the true owners of the mark: “KENYAN BOYS CHOIR” which was virtually identical to the mark in question: “KENYA BOYS CHOIR”. The Registrar ruled in favour of the Choir members in addition to an award of costs. The Registrar found that Inzai had no valid and legal claim to the mark for the reason that his ownership of the mark was not sufficiently substantiated as required by law.

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