2018 Proposed Amendment to The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act

TK and TCE Act Kenya Amendment Bill 2018

The Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2018 seeks to make various, wide-ranging amendments to the existing intellectual property (IP) law-related statutes. The Bill contains proposed amendments to the following pieces of legislation: The Industrial Property Act, 2001 (No. 3 of 2001), The Copyright Act, 2001 (No. 12 of 2001), The Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2008 (No. 13 of 2008) and The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, 2016 (No. 33 of 2016). The Memorandum of Objects and Reasons for the Bill is signed by Hon. Aden Duale, Leader of Majority in the National Assembly and it is dated 29 March 2018. This blogpost will focus on the proposed changes proposed to The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions (TKCE) Act.

In our previous commentary on the TKCE Act (see here), we raised concerns about the lack of an implementation and enforcement framework thus terming the Act as an ‘orphan’ with no clear parent Ministry. Two years later, the 2018 Bill now proposes to amend section 2 of the TKCE to state that ‘the Cabinet Secretary for the time being responsible for matters relating to culture’ shall oversee the implementation and enforcement of the TKCE Act.

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Proposed Amendments to Intellectual Property Laws in Kenya

statute-law-miscellaneous-amendments-bill-no-2-of-2016-submission-memoranda

On 11th November, 2016, pursuant to Special Issue of Kenya Gazette Supplement No.185 (National Assembly Bills No. 45) the Attorney General published the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) (No. 2) Bill 2016. It is recalled that this Bill is intended to “make minor amendments which do not merit the publication of separate Bills and consolidating them into one Bill”. The Bill proposes to amend several intellectual property (IP) laws including Industrial Property Act, 2001 (No. 3 of 2001), Copyright Act, 2001 (No. 12 of 2001) and Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2008 (No. 13 of 2008).

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Book Review: Intellectual Property and Innovation Law in Kenya and Africa by Prof. Ben Sihanya

sihanya

On 27th October 2016, Prof. Sihanya announced the arrival of his long-awaited book titled: “Intellectual Property and Innovation Law in Kenya and Africa: Transferring Technology for Sustainable Development”. The self-published tome is just shy of 700 pages which is not surprising since it rehashes Sihanya’s entire body of work dating back to his 1991 LL.B dissertation. Unapologetically, the self-proclaimed “Father of IP” uses his new book to trace his two decade-long journey of training, research and teaching in intellectual property (IP), complete with footnote references to private class materials from his studies at Warwick and Stanford in the 1990s. Despite all its quirks, the book stands out as the first serious attempt by an African scholar to discuss the development and challenges of IP law, innovation and technology transfer in Kenya. There is no doubt that the book has laid the foundation for future work in IP law across the country for generations to come.

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Kenya’s Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act No. 33 of 2016 Comes into Force

uhuru-kenyatta-president-pscu-signs-tk-tces-bill-august-2016-kenya-2

On 31 August 2016, President Uhuru Kenyatta (pictured above) assented to the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Bill, No.48 of 2015. The Bill was published in Kenya Gazette Supplement No. 154 on 7 September 2016 cited as the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, No. 33 of 2016. The date of commencement of the Act is 21 September 2016, which means the Act is now in force. A copy of the Act is available here.

In previous blogposts here, we have tracked the development of this law aimed at creating an appropriate sui-generis mechanism for the protection of traditional knowledge (TK) and cultural expressions (CEs) which gives effect to Articles 11, 40 and 69(1) (c) of the Constitution. This blogpost provides an overview of the Act with special focus on the issues of concern raised previously with regard to the earlier Bill.

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High Court Rules New Tobacco Law on Packaging, Labelling and Disclosure Does Not Violate Intellectual Property Rights

British American Tobacco Kenya

Previously, this blogger reported here that the High Court had suspended the coming into force of the Tobacco Control Regulations 2014 made by the Cabinet Secretary for Health scheduled to take effect on 1st June 2015. Recently in the case of British American Tobacco Kenya Ltd v Cabinet Secretary for the Ministry of Health & 4 others [2016] eKLR, Lady Justice Mumbi Ngugi (known to many readers for her landmark decision on anti-counterfeit law and access to medicines here) delivered a judgment at the High Court dismissing claims by ‘Big Tobacco’ that their constitutional rights including intellectual property (IP) rights are being violated by the new Tobacco Regulations.

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New Draft Kenya Trade Marks Bill and Trade Mark Rules Published for Public Comment

kenya industrial property institute kipi website notice on drafting instructions for the trade marks act and trade mark rules

In March 2015, Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI) announced that it had prepared Drafting Instructions to overhaul the Trade Marks Act. These Drafting Instructions, which were published for public comment on KIPI’s website, were to be forwarded to the Attorney General’s Office for the necessary action.

This month, KIPI has published the revised Drafting Instructions repealing the Trade Marks Act along  with Drafting Instructions to repeal the Trade Mark Rules. According to KIPI, both these drafts will be forwarded to the Attorney General’s Office for drafting. In the meantime, KIPI requests for any public comments on the drafts to be sent to KIPI via email at info@kipi.go.ke on or before 30th April 2016.

Copies of the revised drafting instructions to amend the Trade Marks Act and Trade Mark Rules are here and here respectively.

How A Typo Cost Safaricom the “OKOA STIMA” Trade Mark in Favour of Colour Planet

okoa stima safaricom colour planet trademark case

Recently, a leading newspaper published a story here stating that Safaricom Limited had obtained interlocutory orders against Colour Planet Limited stating that the latter was “forbidden from interfering with any contracts Safaricom has under the banner Okoa Stima, suggesting to any third party that Safaricom does not have the right to use the name Okoa Stima.” The rest of the story is filled with several contradictory and confusing facts regarding trade mark searches made, trade mark applications filed and trade mark registrations with respect to the Okoa Stima mark by both Safaricom and Colour Planet.

This blogpost is intended to set the record straight on the specific issue of the chronology of events at the Trade Mark Registry of Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI) involving both Colour Planet and Safaricom between March 2015 and January 2016. For intellectual property (IP) practitioners, this post may also serve as a cautionary tale on the importance of care and caution when handling your clients’ matters pending before KIPI.

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