Remuneration Rights vs. Exclusive Rights: IFPI, SCAPR, Kenya Copyright Board Clash over Removal of Section 30A

music recording studio

The International Federation of Musicians (FIM) reports that powerful record label umbrella body International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) has written to Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) demanding the removal of Section 30A of Kenya Copyright Act. (See our previous discussions of section 30A here)

According to FIM, the criticism of section 30A by IFPI is an unacceptable “step backwards, the implication of which is that all treaties guaranteeing artists’ rights would be made devoid of any meaning (Rome Convention, WPPT, Beijing Treaty).”

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The Copyright (Amendment) Act 2014: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

parliament of kenya by diasporadical

This blogger has received official confirmation that the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2014 passed by the National Assembly on 13/08/2014, was assented to by the President of the Republic on 28/11/2014 thereby bringing the Copyright (Amendment) Act 2014 into force. The Bill has effectively amended four sections of the Copyright Act, namely sections 22, 28, 33 and 46. A copy of the Bill is available here.

The Bill’s Memorandum of Objects and Reasons explains that the Copyright Act has been amended to “empower the competent authority to grant a compulsory licence for the publication or republication or broadcasting of works which are subject to copyright where it considers that the right holder withholds consent unreasonably. It [The Bill] also restricts the imposition of a tariff or levying of royalties unless approved by the Cabinet Secretary.”

It is recalled that four other sections in the Copyright Act were amended in 2012 in the exact same manner. Please see this blogger’s comments on the 2012 amendments here. What follows are this blogger’s thoughts on the 2014 amendments to the Act:

Section 22(5)

This is an amendment by insertion. The new subsection inserted relates to the principle of automatic protection under the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (Paris Text 1971). Article 5(2) of the Berne Convention reads:

“The enjoyment and the exercise of these rights shall not be subject to any formality; such enjoyment and such exercise shall be independent of the existence of protection in the country of origin of the work. Consequently, apart from the provisions of this Convention, the extent of protection, as well as the means of redress afforded to the author to protect his rights, shall be governed exclusively by the laws of the country where protection is claimed.”

This blogger reckons that this amendment is aimed at counteracting the effects of section 36 of the Act which requires authentication of copyright works.

Section 28(5)

The amendment to Section 28(5) states that the blank tape levy shall be collected by KECOBO and then distributed to “the respective copyright collecting society registered under section 46”. This wording is problematic since no CMO has been registered to administer audio blank tape compensation from the private copying of musical works and sound recordings.

Currently section 28(3) as read with section 30(6) of the Act provide that that owner of the sound recording and the owner of a related right in the fixation of a performance shall have the right to receive fair compensation consisting of a royalty levied on audio recording equipment or audio blank tape suitable for record and other media intended for recording, payable at the point of first sale in Kenya by the manufacturer or importer of such equipment or media.

Section 28(4) as read with section 30(7) further provides that the royalty payable under the above subsection (3) shall be agreed between organisations representative of producers of sound recordings, performers, manufacturers and importers of audio recording equipment, audio blank tape and media intended for recording or failing such agreement by the competent authority appointed under section 48.
From the aforegoing, it is clear that the copyright owners of musical works have been systematically side-lined from receiving any compensation from the collection of audio blank tape levies within the Republic of Kenya.

With reference to international best practices, it is clear that Kenya’s current legislative provisions on private copy levying are not only illegal but more importantly unconstitutional. This line of argument has been explored by this blogger here.

Finally, this blogger wonders whether the reference to “the respective copyright collecting society registered under section 46” in the amendment creates an opportunity for establishing a Collective Agency for blank tape levy administration. In other jurisdictions, such Agencies do exist and are made up of all CMOs that represent concerned rights holders.

Section 33A

This is an amendment by insertion. The new section inserted officially introduces compulsory licensing in Kenyan copyright law. However this blogger has argued previously that section 30A in the 2012 Amendments was the Government’s successful move to unofficially introduce a compulsory licensing regime under the guise of the right to equitable remuneration.

Compulsory license is the term generally applied to a statutorily license to do an act covered by an exclusive right, without the prior authority of the right owner. This concept of compulsory licensing in copyright is derived from patent law, where the owner is forced to face the competition in market, similarly in copyright law; the copyright holder is subjected to equitable remuneration. One of the main reasons for introducing non-voluntary licenses is where the users of certain works have access to these works on terms which are known in advance and it is not practicable for them to locate right owners and obtain an individual license from them.

Article 9(2) of the Berne Convention provides the legal basis for compulsory licensing in copyright law. The Article reads:

“It shall be a matter for legislation in the countries of the union to permit the reproduction of such works in special cases, provided that such reproduction does not conflict with the normal exploitation of the work and does not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author.”

This provision provides the Convention’s exclusive basis for compulsory licensing and provides for the conditions which should be met before a member country can entirely excuse a use which includes compulsory licensing and not prejudicing the reasonable interests of the author. Therefore this Article provides the so-called three (3) step test for compulsory licensing, namely exceptional circumstances, no conflict with the normal exploitation of the work and no unreasonable prejudice to legitimate interests of the author.

Article 11 bis (2) provides that:-

“It shall be a matter for legislation in the country of the Union to determine the conditions under which the rights mentioned in the preceding paragraph [11 bis (1)] may be exercised but these conditions shall apply only in the countries where they have been prescribed. They shall not in any circumstances be prejudicial to the moral rights of the author, nor to is right to obtain equitable remuneration which in the absence of agreement, shall be fixed by competent authority.”

The amendment to section 33 emphasises the regulatory role of the Competent Authority (aka Copyright Tribunal) in compulsory licensing. This role is common in other common law jurisdictions such as the UK, US, Australia and India.

As this blogger has previously noted here, the reality in Kenya is that the Competent Authority provided under section 48 of the Act remains non-existent over a decade since the establishment of the Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO). This situation is problematic as there are no mechanisms in place to monitor the practical implementation of the compulsory licences under section 30A and the proposed section 33A.

Section 46A

This is an amendment by insertion. The newly introduced section 46A creates an approval system for all tariffs set by CMOs to license copyright users. This new section prohibits any registered CMOs from imposing or collecting royalty based on tariffs that have not been approved and published in the Government Gazette from time to time by “the Cabinet Secretary in charge of copyright issues”. In addition, the new section empowers “the Cabinet Secretary” to exempt users of copyright works from paying royalties by notice in the Gazette.

A preliminary issue that may require clarification is whether the Attorney General can be deemed to be “the Cabinet Secretary” for purposes of the Act? The Act defines “Minister” as “the Minister for the time being responsible for matters relating to copyright and related rights”. In the previous dispensation, the Attorney General (who was an ex-officio member of the Cabinet) assumed the role as “Minister” since KECOBO was under the Office of the Attorney-General. It is submitted that there is an established practice in Kenya whereby the Attorney General exercised the powers and performed the functions conferred on the “Minister” such as appointment of the Competent Authority and making Regulations for the better carrying out of the provisions of the Act.

However this issue is now settled under the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Act, 2014 which has amended the definition of “Minister” under the Interpretation and General Provisions Act (Cap 2 Laws of Kenya) making specific reference to the Attorney General. The relevant portion of the amendment has been reproduced below:

Statute Law Miscelleneous Amendments Act 2014 Kenya

Nevertheless, this blogger maintains that the section 46A amendment may serve to further frustrate the relationship between CMOs and users of copyright. Over the years, this relationship has been severely strained due to the absence of the Competent Authority – a body which is authorised under the Act to deal with all issues relating to the licensing terms and conditions imposed on users by CMOs. The powers given to the Attorney General to approve tariffs and to exempt users from paying royalties may also prove problematic for CMOs.

Regrettably, this blogger notes that KECOBO and the Office of the Attorney General did not formally invite for public comments and/or conduct stakeholder consultations before causing these amendments to the Copyright Act to be passed by the Legislature and the Executive.

In the next blogpost, this blogger will discuss another set of IP law-related amendments with respect to the Kenya Anti-Counterfeit Act as contained in the Statute Law Miscellaneous Amendments Bill, 2014.

Revisiting Section 30A of the Copyright Act: Right to Equitable Remuneration for Performers and Producers

eric

“For many years Kenyan composers and authors have received royalties from the broadcast or public performance of their songs. These royalties are collected by the Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK).
The Copyright Act has since been amended to acknowledge the essential contribution of performers and producers of sound recordings in the creation of recorded music and works by including a right to equitable remuneration for both the performers and producers, which is in line with international best practices. The rights to equitable remuneration are the rights of performers and producers to be paid fairly for the broadcast and communication to the public of their works.” – Performers Rights Society of Kenya (PRiSK)

In 2012, the Copyright Act was amended with the insertion of a new provision, section 30A which introduced the right to equitable remuneration for use of sound recordings and audio-visual works. This blogger has discussed this section in several blogposts available here, here and here.

In a recent article, intellectual property (IP) lawyer Judy Chebet argues here that section 30A is unconstitutional as it obliges performers and music producers to cede some of their rights to collective management organisations (CMOs). While this blogger fundamentally disagrees with Chebet, it is argued that her views raise serious concerns that must be addressed by the Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) and the related rights CMOs both of whom play an important role in explaining to the Kenyan public (in a fair amount of detail) exactly “what section 30A is all about”.

Copyright and related rights are bundles of different rights which can be exercised individually or, where for practical purposes it is very difficult to enter into individual arrangements, can be managed by collective management organisations (CMOs). Because of the uses to which sound recordings and fixations of performances are traditionally put, collective management has become an indispensible method by which performers and producers can be remunerated for the uses of their performances or recordings.

Both Article 12 of the Rome Convention and Article 15 of the WIPO Performances and Phonograms Treaty (WPPT) give performers and producers of sound recordings a right to a single equitable remuneration for broadcasting and communication to the public. In most CMOs this will be the great bulk of the collectable remuneration.

The WPPT goes on to provide that the contracting parties may establish in their national legislation that the single equitable remuneration shall be claimed from the user by the performer or by the producer or by both. The single equitable remuneration may be shared by agreement or domestic legislation may provide how the remuneration must be shared.

Given this modern environment it has started to make more sense for the activities of performers’ and producers’ CMOs to be merged into one organisation; the users are the same and the remuneration has to be shared so that it can be more efficient for one organisation to collect and to manage the distribution of the remuneration to the different parties. The efficiencies also benefit the user who only has one organisation to pay. Even in cases where there are two separate CMOs, they can collect jointly but distribute separately. This is the case for instance in Kenya with Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP) or even the case of Sweden with SAMI and the Swedish Group of IFPI. In the Kenyan context this blogger has previously discussed the amalgamation of KAMP and PRiSK here.

Therefore, to the extent that Chebet argues section 30A creates a conflict with the WPPT in that the latter does not allow compulsory licensing, this blogger concurs fully with Chebet. However, the point of departure with Chebet’s views is that this form of mandatory collective management through compulsory licensing amounts to a limitation of Article 40 of the Constitution (Protection to right to property) that is not in accordance with Article 24 (Limitation of rights and fundamental freedoms).

Compulsory licensing is the term generally applied to a statutory license to do an act covered by an exclusive right, without the prior authority of the right owner. This concept of compulsory licensing in copyright is derived from patent law, where the owner is forced to face the competition in market, similarly in copyright law; the copyright holder is subjected to equitable remuneration. One of the main reasons for introducing non-voluntary licenses is where the users of certain works have access to these works on terms which are known in advance and it is not practicable for them to locate right owners and obtain an individual license from them.

According to copyright scholars, legislative arrangements for equitable remuneration occupy a position on the continuum of copyright and author’s right somewhere between exclusive rights and absolute exemptions. In strictly economic terms, these arrangements reflect the legislator’s judgment that to extend an exclusive right would hamper socially important uses, typically because of the high transaction cost of negotiating a license, but that to make the use entirely free would seriously impair needed rewards for the author. Compulsory licenses trade the bargaining power conferred by the prospect of injunctive or other coercive relief for a monetary award aimed at approximating the sum a reasonable licensee would in good faith offer and a reasonable copyright owner would in good faith accept.

Article 9(2) of the Berne Convention provides the legal basis for compulsory licensing in copyright law. The Article reads:

“It shall be a matter for legislation in the countries of the union to permit the reproduction of such works in special cases, provided that such reproduction does not conflict with the normal exploitation of the work and does not unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of the author.”
This provision provides the Convention’s exclusive basis for equitable remuneration and provides for the conditions which should be met before a member country can entirely excuse a use which includes the equitable remuneration and not prejudicing the reasonable interests of the author. Therefore this Article provides the so-called three (3) step test for compulsory licensing, namely exceptional circumstances, no conflict with the normal exploitation of the work and no unreasonable prejudice to legitimate interests of the author.

Article 11 bis (2) provides that:-

“It shall be a matter for legislation in the country of the Union to determine the conditions under which the rights mentioned in the preceding paragraph [11 bis (1)] may be exercised but these conditions shall apply only in the countries where they have been prescribed. They shall not in any circumstances be prejudicial to the moral rights of the author, nor to is right to obtain equitable remuneration which in the absence of agreement, shall be fixed by competent authority.”

Therefore in order for Chebet’s unconstitutionality argument to succeed, this blogger submits that the enactment of section 30A must be proved to be a violation of the Berne 3-step test in a manner that unreasonably and unjustifiably limits the rights enshrined under Article 40 as set out in Article 24.

Meanwhile, this blogger reiterates that the real elephant in the room is the government’s regulatory role vis-a-vis equitable remuneration.

In the UK, the Copyright Tribunal established under the Copyright, Patents and Designs Act, 1988 is empowered to determine the amount of equitable remuneration payable to performers where commercially published sound recordings of their works are performed or communicated to the public. In Australia, the Copyright Tribunal, established under the Copyright Act 1968, is similar in the scope of its jurisdiction to the 1988 UK Tribunal, including determination of remuneration to be paid in respect of certain uses which are subject to compulsory licenses.

In the US, the US Copyright Act 1976 created a Copyright Royalty Tribunal comprising five government-appointed Commissioners with a Chairman appointed annually. The Tribunal’s jurisdiction includes determining royalty rates payable under certain compulsory licenses, and the distribution of royalty fees deposited with the Register of Copyrights in respect to those compulsory licenses.

Meanwhile here in Kenya, the Competent Authority established under section 48 of the Act remains non-existent over a decade since the establishment of the Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO). This situation is problematic as there are no mechanisms in place to monitor the practical implementation of the compulsory licences under section 30A.

#PharmaGate: South Africa’s Push for Patent Law Reforms Exposes Both Government and Drug Companies

The Mail and Guardian (M&G) newspaper in South Africa published a story titled: “Motsoaledi: Big pharma’s ‘satanic’ plot is genocide” where it is reported that Health minister Aaron Motsoaledi is livid about a pharmaceutical company campaign he says will restrict access to crucial drugs. This plan which was leaked to the press is now at the heart of the so-called #PharmaGate scandal which has received widespread condemnation.

All in all, this blogger submits that #PharmaGate exposes the South Africa government’s criticized track record with regard to implementation of existing laws relating to access to medicines. In addition, the Trade and Industry’s Ministry unsatisfactory drafting of the DNIPP is exposed once more. Therefore the Health Minister’s latest sensationalist remarks reported by the M&G appear to be intend to deflect attention from the above issues of poor implementation and drafting by the Executive branch. As for the drug companies, #PharmaGate only exposes the capitalist and pro-intellectual property (IP) ownership stance of Big Pharma, aptly captured in the critically acclaimed documentary, “Fire in The Blood”, whose trailer is featured above.

Read the full story here.

Proposed Intellectual Property Law Amendments: Kenya Copyright Act

Parliament of Kenya

Recently, the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2013 was published in Kenya Gazette Supplement No. 146 (Bills No. 32). The Bill seeks to amend four sections of the Copyright Act, namely sections 22, 28, 33 and 46. A copy of this Bill is available here (See pages 933-936).

It is recalled that four other sections in the Copyright Act were amended in 2012
in the exact same manner. Please see this blogger’s comments on the 2012 amendments here. What follows are this blogger’s thoughts on the proposed 2013 amendments to the Act

Read the rest of this article here.