Controversial 2018 Proposed Amendments to The Anti-Counterfeit Act

2018 Amendments to Anti-Counterfeit Act Kenya ACA Bill

The Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2018 seeks to make various, wide-ranging amendments to existing intellectual property (IP) law-related statutes. The Bill contains proposed amendments to the following pieces of legislation: The Industrial Property Act, 2001 (No. 3 of 2001), The Copyright Act, 2001 (No. 12 of 2001), The Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2008 (No. 13 of 2008) and The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, 2016 (No. 33 of 2016). The Memorandum of Objects and Reasons for the Bill is signed by Hon. Aden Duale, Leader of Majority in the National Assembly and it is dated 29 March 2018. This blogpost will focus on the proposed changes to The Anti-Counterfeit Act.

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Kenyans Pay Three Times More Than South Africans to Use Sound Recordings: Lessons from Appeal Court Judgment in SAMPRA v. Foschini Retail Group & 9 Ors

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Recently, Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) published on its website here the proposed 2016 collecting society joint tariffs for musical works, sound recordings and audio-visual works. A copy of these joint tariffs is available here. In order to ensure public participation before the approval of these tariffs, KECOBO will convene an open half-day public forum to be held next week on February 10th 2016 at the Auditorium of NHIF Building starting at 8:30am.

This blogpost will focus on the tariffs for sound recordings since they have recently been the subject of thorough debate and analysis in South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal. It is hoped that the South African experience will be useful to Kenyan users in their negotiations with collecting societies on reasonable tariffs to pay for use of copyright works.

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Kenya Copyright Board Suggests Guernsey Approach to Image Rights Protection

Kenya Copyright Board Publication Copyright News Issue 18 2015 Cover

The most recent edition of Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) newsletter (cover pictured above) focuses on photography and image rights. A copy of the full Issue 18 is available here.

In the lead article starting on page 4 by KECOBO Executive Director, a compelling case is made in favour of specific legal protection of image rights, particularly in the case of celebrities. The article uses the oft-cited case of Dennis Oliech v. EABL (previously discussed here) to illustrate the limitations of existing intellectual property (IP) regimes in cases of commercial appropriation of one’s personality and/or image.

The article reads in part as follows:

“The use of images and personality rights is gaining currency and there is need to ensure that the same is well regulated and third parties do not take undue advantage of the commercialisation of the same. Guernsey provides a good example and maybe we should follow suit.”

This view from the Copyright Office begs the question: will Kenya be better off with a specific law on image rights like Guernsey? This blogger argues that the answer must be “No”.

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Room for Judicial Review in Collective Administration of Copyright: High Court Judgment in Nakuru Pub Owners v. KAMP & PRISK

KAMP PRISK

The High Court of Kenya sitting at Nakuru has recently handed down an interesting judgment in the case of Republic v Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP) & another Ex-Parte Nakuru Municipality Pubs, Bars, Restaurants and Hotel Owners Association (Suing Through Their Trustees) [2015] eKLR. A copy of the judgment is available here. In this case, Nakuru Municipality Pubs, Bars, Restaurants and Hotel Owners Association sought judicial review orders of prohibition to restrain two collective management organisations (CMOs) from collecting licence fees and or levies from the membership of the Association. The CMOs in question: Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP) and Performers Rights Society of Kenya (PRiSK), two related rights CMOs representing owners of sound recordings and performers respectively.

The crux of the Association’s case against the CMOs is as follows:

“It is argued that the proposed levies and licences were never communicated to their association or any of the members, and that as they were not notified, or invited to participate in their formulation and approval nor gazetted/published, the Respondents [CMOs] failed in their duty to communicate the passage and approval of the levies to them, they are in breach of rules of natural justice by withholding information that would affect them economically and financially and a breach of their constitutional rights as enshrined in Article 43 of the Constitution. (…)”

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High Court Stops Zuku, PANG and StarTimes from Infringing KBC World Cup 2014 Exclusive Media Rights

Media reports (here, here, here and here) indicate that the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) has moved to the High Court under Certificate of Urgency seeking interim injunctive orders against Pay TV companies Wananchi Group, Pan African Network Group (PANG) and StarTimes Media. It is reported that Ogola J sitting in the High Court made the following ruling:

“Pending the hearing and determination of this suit, an injunction is issued restraining the respondents (Wananchi, PANG and StarTimes) from infringing by way of advertising, broadcasting or promoting the tournament the rights of KBC”

From the outset, it is important to state that the rights in question are FIFA Media Rights conferred exclusively to KBC for the territory of Kenya (See our previous analysis here). In this regard, KBC alleges that its exclusive rights were infringed through hacking of its signals and broadcasting of the World Cup opening match along with the adverts paid for to be aired during the match. In this regard, KBC claimed that these companies used the popularity of the World Cup to attract advertisers and make sales of their decoders.
In the case of StarTimes, it is alleged that even after KBC blocked StarTimes from its digital platform, StarTimes used the analogue signal to re-broadcast live matches of KBC to its Kenyan viewers and those in Uganda and Tanzania.

Read the full article here.

2013 Year in Review: Intellectual Property in Kenya

2013 was an election year for Kenya which resulted in the swearing in of Uhuru Kenyatta as the fourth President of the Republic. Kenyatta has been very supportive of the creative economy and has on several occasions reiterated his administration’s commitment to creating a conducive environment for creators to reap from their intellectual property (IP) assets. However, Kenyatta’s mark on IP this year was the decision to reform all state corporations and parastatals in Kenya which has set in motion plans to merge the copyright office, the industrial property office and the anti-counterfeit agency into one national IP office.

Copyright and Related Rights

In 2013, copyright news was monopolized by Safaricom which was embroiled with two high profile copyright cases with Faulu Kenya and JB Maina. Another popular copyright story was Longhorn’s acquisition of publishing rights for iconic educational textbooks writer, Malkiat Singh.

The year was also memorable for Kenya as she successfully negotiated and signed the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who are BIlind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled.

Industrial Property

In 2013, trade marks stole the show with several far reaching rulings by the Registrar of Trademarks as well as the landmark acquisition of a local trademark by a multinational cosmetics company. In addition, trademark administration has continued to be the major revenue earner for the national IP office, Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI) especially through the Madrid System.

The Red Bull case (available online) was an important decision in that it expanded the Kenyan IP jurisprudence in respect of the doctrines of “conceptual similarity” and “well-known marks”.

In the Basmati case, a clear distinction was drawn between trade marks and geographical indications within the context of Kenya’s international obligations under the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of IP (TRIPs) adopted in section 40A of the Kenya Trademarks Act.

In the Pyrex case (available online), the Registrar found that the withdrawal of a threat of opposition does not amount to a surrender of your rights to institute cancellation proceedings in respect of the same trade mark. This ruling was important because it provides a practical application of two amended provisions of the Act, namely Section 36A and 36B of the Act.

Later in the year, one of the largest cosmetics companies in the world, L’Oréal fully acquired the health and beauty divisions of local firm, Interconsumer Products Ltd, makers of Nice & Lovely brands, in a multi-billion shilling transaction. This acquisition is seen as part of L’Oreal’s push to dominate the East Africa’s low-end cosmetic market.

Legislative Developments

As previously discussed here, several amendments have been proposed to the Copyright and the Anti Counterfeit Acts in the Statute Law Miscellaneous Bill currently before Parliament is passed. Earlier this year, a proposed draft law on the protection of traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions was validated.

This year saw the enactment of the Science, Technology and Innovation Act, Consumer Protection Act, Media Council of Kenya Act and Kenya Information and Communication Amendment Act, all of which will affect IP administration and enforcement both directly and indirectly.

For more stories from 2013, check out the IPKenya archive on the right hand side of this page and information from other sites on our twitter feed.

See you all in 2014!