#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 06/07

WIPO GII 2018 Dg3UBxgU8AAcHOu

  • The Global Innovation Index (GII) 2018 to be released next week [You’re Invited]
  • What the WTO decision on plain packaging means for developing countries [devex]
  • Time for a bioeconomy in Africa [ICIPE]
  • How fab labs help meet digital challenges in Africa [The Conversation]
  • Lionel Messi: Image Rights, International Financial Flows, Tax Havens and its Impact on Africa and Kenya [Academia]
  • Uganda’s Troubling Social Media Tax [HRW]
  • Kenya’s Digital Taxi Services Paralyzed, Strike Enters 4th Day [VOA]
  • Comment on South Africa’s Copyright Amendment Bill Until 18 July [PEN SA]
  • On the 36th Session of the WIPO – IGC: An Interview with Professor Chidi Oguamanam [Flora IP]
  • Ghana’s Copyright Administrator ordered to release funds to Audio-Visual Rights Society [GNA]
  • Intellectual Property Issues in Access and Benefit-sharing Agreements [WIPO]
  • Governance Issues of Nigerian Music Collecting Society, COSON Continues [Afro-IP]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other intellectual property-related items that you may come across.

Have a great week-end!

#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 15/06

Matthew Inman Oatmeal World Cup 2018 DfmH7qZVMAAkmZe

World Cup 2018 starts this week!

  • ARIPO holds the Second Symposium on Copyright and Related Rights [Official]
  • Tete Goat – First Geographical Indication of Mozambique [Inventa]
  • Namibia introduces new Industrial Property Act [A+ Bunch of Lawyers]
  • Competition Authority confirms Egypt’s right to air 22 World Cup games [Egypt Today]
  • Should Africa let Silicon Valley in? [The Guardian]
  • Kenya to publish draft data protection bill this month [Reuters]
  • Rethinking Uganda’s State Brand Strategy Using Intangible Assets [Amani IP Network]
  • Restriction on Parallel Imports Gets Red-Lighted By Competition Authority of Kenya [BD Africa]
  • Stolen melodies: Copyright law in Africa [Deutsche Welle]
  • Rwanda: Experts call for autonomous Intellectual Property office [The New Times]
  • Kenya: Sharing books online kills creativity, it’s outright theft [One-sided coin]
  • Anti-Counterfeit Agency Insults Intelligence of Stakeholders at ‘Consultative Forum’ on Proposed IP Law [Shameless Plug]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other intellectual property-related items that you may come across.

Have a great week-end!

Kenya’s Computer Misuse and Cybercrimes Bill Signed into Law

Uhuru Kenyatta signs Computer Misuse and Cybercrimes Bill into law 16 May 2018

On 16 May 2018, President Uhuru Kenyatta (pictured above) assented to the Computer Misuse and Cybercrimes Bill, 2018. The Bill was passed by the National Assembly on 26 April 2018. Readers of this blog will note that, unlike the previous Computer and Cybercrimes Bill, 2017 that was first tabled in Parliament, the Act now contains some new provisions relating to blockchain, mobile money, offences related to cybersquatting, electronic messages, revenge porn, identity theft and impersonation, as well as the newly created National Computer and Cybercrimes Coordination Committee. A copy of the Act is available here.

From an intellectual property (IP) perspective, the Act is significant for several reasons, including that it creates new offences and prescribes penalties related to cyber-infringements, it regulates jurisdiction, as well as the powers to investigate search and gain access to or seize items in relation to cybercrimes. It also regulates aspects of electronic evidence, relative to cybercrimes as well as aspects of international cooperation in respect to investigations of cybercrimes. Finally it creates several stringent obligations and requirements for service providers. Continue reading

Government Invites Public Views on Liability of Online Intermediaries for Copyright Infringement

wapkid sauti sol

In recent media reports here and here, Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) reveals that it has proposed draft legal provisions to deal with the liability of internet/online intermediaries. KECOBO Chief Legal Counsel (CLC) has been kind enough to share with this blogger a copy of the proposed draft legal provisions available here. KECOBO CLC has also indicated to this blogger that there are plans underway to hold a public forum in the coming months to discuss the draft provisions and receive comments from the public.

Continue reading

Anton Piller Orders Issued Against Kenya Broadcasting Corporation and One FM for Intellectual Property Rights Breach

IPKenya has been informed that the Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) conducted raids on two broadcasting stations, namely the popular urban radio station, One FM and the national broadcaster, Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) on January 31, 2014. These raids were carried out after MCSK successfully obtained Anton Piller orders in suits filed for copyright infringement.

In its application for Anton Piller orders against the two stations, MCSK’s lawyers relied on the following two grounds:

“1. The Defendant is engaged in and will continue to be engaged in unlawful broadcasting and reproduction of copyrighted musical works falling within the Plaintiff’s repertoire. Therefore this application seeks to enable the Plaintiff to take inventory and seize digital database(s) and libraries of musical works, related records and documents in the premises of the Defendant.

2. The Plaintiff has a well-founded apprehension that infringing copies of fixations of copyrighted musical works and related materials in possession of the Defendant will be hidden, disappear or will not be available at the time of the hearing unless this matter is heard as a matter of urgency and the orders sought granted.”

In the case of KBC, MCSK alleges that the national broadcaster owes over KES 3,000,000 in royalty arrears since 2012. This figure encompasses the controlled music content in KBC’s television station Channel One as well as its radio station. However, according to MCSK, the case of One FM illustrates the most flagrant infringement of copyright as the radio station has never taken out a broadcasting license from MCSK despite being in operation for several years. One FM’s royalty arrears are estimated to be well over KES 4,000,000.

On hearing the application by MCSK, the Court sitting at Milimani ordered that an order be issued under section 37 of the Copyright Act allowing MCSK by itself, its servants, employees or agents to access or enter the offices or premises of the Defendnat to observe and take inventory of all musical works the infringing stations broadcast.

A copy of the court order obtained against KBC can be viewed below. A similar order was issued against One FM:

KBC COURT ORDER

In a recent press statement, the Chief Executive at MCSK states:

“MCSK has over the past years been negotiating with some of the defaulting broadcasters and it was after lengthy negotiations where ONE FM, KBC and others in the pipeline, failed, refused and / or neglected to comply with the legal requirement for taking of broadcasting license from MCSK. There are several other broadcasting stations that have been lined up for Court action if they do not acquire the MCSK license such as MEDIA MAX LTD, SOUND ASIA.

MCSK shall be seeking a permanent injunction to restrain both ONE FM and KBC from broadcasting any and all musical works in KENYA since MCSK controls both local and international works. This could then mean that both ONE FM and KBC will be off air when the permanent injunction is granted.

It really would be a shame since the two media houses have positioned themselves as promoting local music yet they are not paying royalties. The local musicians who they seek to promote cannot at all benefit since no monies are paid to them by MCSK since no royalties are paid by the said media houses.”

Comment:

The recent Annual Global Economic Survey of Authors’ Society Royalty Collections by International Confederation of Authors and Composers Societies (CISAC) reveals that 7.8 Billion Euros was collected worldwide. 75% of these collections were from public performance royalties, which is predominantly made up of collections from broadcasters. Within the CISAC African region, MCSK is ranked in the top 3 highest royalty earners despite broadcasters in Kenya being among the lowest royalty payers in proportion to their music usage. It is estimated that MCSK stands to collect over KES 110,000,000 in royalty arrears from television and radio broadcasters spread throughout the country.

Current statistics from the Communication Commission of Kenya (CCK) indicate that there are over 100 licensed FM frequencies and over 15 TV frequencies therefore MCSK ought to be collecting about KES 52,000,000 annually in broadcasting royalties alone!

This situation will become even more interesting as Kenya expects a sharp rise in broadcasters once digital migration finally receives the green light from the Court of Appeal.

A Kenyan Perspective of South Africa’s Draft National Policy on Intellectual Property

South_africa_parliament1

As many IP enthusiasts may have heard, South Africa has recently published a Draft National Policy on Intellectual Property (IP) (hereafter the Policy). Within the Kenyan context, this blogger has previously questioned the need for a national IP policy particularly in light of the recognition given to IP in the Constitution. However, for the purposes of this post, the policy provides a good basis for a comparative analysis of the state of IP in both South Africa and Kenya as well as possible recommendations to strengthen IP laws.

In the area of patents, Kenya’s IP office undertakes both formal and substantive examinations of patent applications whereas in South Africa, the Policy recommends the establishment of a substantive of a substantive search and examination of patents to address issue of “weak” vs “strong” patents. The policy’s recommendation to amend South African patent law to include pre-and post-opposition would also be instructive to Kenya.

Read the rest of this article here.