Controversial 2018 Proposed Amendments to The Anti-Counterfeit Act

2018 Amendments to Anti-Counterfeit Act Kenya ACA Bill

The Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2018 seeks to make various, wide-ranging amendments to existing intellectual property (IP) law-related statutes. The Bill contains proposed amendments to the following pieces of legislation: The Industrial Property Act, 2001 (No. 3 of 2001), The Copyright Act, 2001 (No. 12 of 2001), The Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2008 (No. 13 of 2008) and The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, 2016 (No. 33 of 2016). The Memorandum of Objects and Reasons for the Bill is signed by Hon. Aden Duale, Leader of Majority in the National Assembly and it is dated 29 March 2018. This blogpost will focus on the proposed changes to The Anti-Counterfeit Act.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Kenya’s Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act No. 33 of 2016 Comes into Force

uhuru-kenyatta-president-pscu-signs-tk-tces-bill-august-2016-kenya-2

On 31 August 2016, President Uhuru Kenyatta (pictured above) assented to the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Bill, No.48 of 2015. The Bill was published in Kenya Gazette Supplement No. 154 on 7 September 2016 cited as the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, No. 33 of 2016. The date of commencement of the Act is 21 September 2016, which means the Act is now in force. A copy of the Act is available here.

In previous blogposts here, we have tracked the development of this law aimed at creating an appropriate sui-generis mechanism for the protection of traditional knowledge (TK) and cultural expressions (CEs) which gives effect to Articles 11, 40 and 69(1) (c) of the Constitution. This blogpost provides an overview of the Act with special focus on the issues of concern raised previously with regard to the earlier Bill.

Continue reading

Government Invites Public Views on Liability of Online Intermediaries for Copyright Infringement

wapkid sauti sol

In recent media reports here and here, Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) reveals that it has proposed draft legal provisions to deal with the liability of internet/online intermediaries. KECOBO Chief Legal Counsel (CLC) has been kind enough to share with this blogger a copy of the proposed draft legal provisions available here. KECOBO CLC has also indicated to this blogger that there are plans underway to hold a public forum in the coming months to discuss the draft provisions and receive comments from the public.

Continue reading

Legal Protection for TV Formats: Another Sui-Generis Area of Intellectual Property Law?

Dads Can Cook TV Kenya

Imagine this scenario: You’re a budding creator and film producer who develops this brilliant reality show which is being aired in one of our local TV channels. At the end of the first season of your hit show, the TV broadcaster discontinues your show. One month later, you discover that the same TV channel or a rival TV station has premiered its own show which is a carbon copy of your own show which they discontinued. What recourse would you have under intellectual property law?

At the CIPIT Seminar #KnowUrIP, Mr. Martin Munyua (@MartinMunyua) the editor and creator of the hit TV show “Dads Can Cook” painted this very same scenario drawn from his real-life experiences. The topic of TV format protection in Kenya may becoming pertinent as local creators and innovators continue to create programming content at a level that compares favourably both regionally and internationally. Domestically, the growth and expansion of the TV industry has resulted in cut-throat competition among broadcasting houses who increasingly demand for new and original programming content. Many TV viewers in Kenya may recall the case of two similar shows on two rival networks namely, “Mali” and “Lies That Bind” on NTV and KTN respectively. This case illustrated the level of competition among TV networks and how popular TV shows, concepts, formats and themes can be copied, replicated, modified across these networks to capture a larger share of viewership.

Read the rest of this article at the CIPIT Law Blog here.