#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 31/08

African Union Addis Abeba Ethiopia Second Extraordinary Congress Universal Postal Union 2018 Ababa

  • Ethiopia: Gearing up the postal sector to drive development [UPU]
  • Egypt: Mo Salah accuses Football Association of ignoring image rights [BBC]
  • Ghana: ARIPO launches Masters in Intellectual Property at KNUST [Going Places]
  • Nigeria: ‘White gold’ – GM cotton hope for troubled textile industry [GLP]
  • South Africa: Collecting society SAMRO under fire over multi-million US Dollar Dubai investment [Apparently]
  • Zimbabwe: ARIPO Magazine Vol.8 No.2 is out [Get Your Copy Here]
  • Kenya: Struggle to modernise traditional medicine is far from won [The Star]
  • Double Trademark Law Whammy this week over at Afro-IP [Afro Leo & Friends]
  • ICYMI: This Blogger is Now A Member of the Copyright Tribunal [Shameless Plug]
  • New Paper Looks At Differential Protection For TK, Folklore [IP-Watch]
  • Creative Markets and Copyright in the Fourth Industrial Era: Reconfiguring the Public Benefit for a Digital Trade Economy [Okediji]
  • 5th Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest [Register Here]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other IP/ICT-related items that you may come across.

Have a great week-end!

Advertisements

2018 Proposed Amendment to The Copyright Act

2018 Amendments to Copyright Act Kenya KECOBO Bill

The Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill, 2018 seeks to make various, wide-ranging amendments to existing intellectual property (IP) law-related statutes. The Bill contains proposed amendments to the following pieces of legislation: The Industrial Property Act, 2001 (No. 3 of 2001), The Copyright Act, 2001 (No. 12 of 2001), The Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2008 (No. 13 of 2008) and The Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions Act, 2016 (No. 33 of 2016). The Memorandum of Objects and Reasons for the Bill is signed by Hon. Aden Duale, Leader of Majority in the National Assembly and it is dated 29 March 2018. This blogpost will focus on the changes proposed to The Copyright Act.

Continue reading

MCSK Board Unceremoniously Removes Long-serving CEO

MCSK Maurice Okoth Public Notice Resignation Newspaper Music Copyright Society of Kenya 2016

In the above public notice in today’s newspaper, Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) states as follows:

“This is to inform the general public that Mr. Dan Maurice Okoth resigned from his position as the Chief Executive Officer of MCSK. Mr. Okoth ceased to be an employee of MCSK from 24th March 2016. He is therefore, not authorized to transact any business in the name of or on behalf of MCSK and that MCSK shall not take responsibility for any transactions made by him”

Continue reading

High Court Upholds Freeze of Collecting Society’s Bank Accounts: Ruling in MCSK v Chief Magistrate, Inspector General

Music-Copyright-Society-of-Kenya-MCSK-CEO-Maurice-Okoth People Daily

This blogger has recently come across an astute ruling by the High Court in the case of Music Copyright Society of Kenya v Chief Magistrate’s Court & Inspector General of Police [2015] eKLR. Justice L. Kimaru sitting in the High Court was approached by the authors’ collecting society, Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) to stay orders issued by the Magistrate’s Court freezing all the bank accounts of MCSK following a request by the Serious Crimes Unit under the Directorate of Criminal Investigations (DCI). DCI requested that MCSK’s accounts be frozen as it investigates complaints made by MCSK members in regard to alleged misappropriation and theft of funds at the collecting society.

After carefully evaluating the facts before him, Kimaru J ruled that the investigations were lawful and based on several complaints received by DCI from MCSK members and that the orders to freeze MCSK’s accounts were within the precincts of the law.

Continue reading

New Rules for Intellectual Property Business as Companies Bill 2015 Signed into Law

Uhuru Kenyatta Companies Bill 2015

This week President Kenyatta (pictured above) signed into law the Companies Bill 2015 that does away with the Companies Act Chapter 486 of the Laws of Kenya which is an archaic piece of legislation dating back to 1948. The new Companies Act is aimed at revolutionising business in the country by removing various pre-existing legislative stumbling blocks to doing business in Kenya. From an intellectual property (IP) perspective, the new Act has several important provisions that will affect how IP assets are managed by various business entities.

With over 1,000 sections, the new Act is incredibly detailed (bulky) and comprehensive. It codifies common law principles – in particular, the indoor management rule and common law fiduciary duties of directors. Along with this, it modernises company law by recognising electronic communication and the use of websites and other electronic avenues for a company’s communications. The new Act has also increased the penalties and fines for offences relating to companies. This blogpost will highlight some of the major changes in the new Companies Act.

Continue reading

Uganda: Court Awards 400 Million Shillings for Contempt of Court in Trade Mark Infringement Suit

MEGHA INDUSTRIES ROYALFOAM MATTRESS SCREENSHOT COMFOAM PASSING-OFF INFRINGEMENT UGANDA

This blogger has come across a recent judgment from the Commercial Division of the Ugandan High Court in the case of Megha Industries (U) Ltd v Comfoam Uganda Limited [2014] UGCOMMC 162 relating to alleged infringement by Comfoam of cover designs on mattresses registered under the trade mark “ROYALFOAM” by the Megha. Coincidentally, many readers of this blog will note that the expression "going to the mattresses" used in the classic 1972 movie The Godfather, is a euphemism that means “going to war”. So, Megha went to war over its mattresses and Comfoam admitted to passing off Megha’s goods so the parties entered into a consent judgment on 03.02.12, which was sealed by the court on 17.02.12. By the consent decree, a permanent injunction was issued restraining Comfoam, its agents or servants from passing off its goods as Megha’s ROYALFOAM brand of mattresses. The injunction also restrained Comfoam from further producing and or manufacturing mattresses with the infringing mattress cover design the subject of the suit. In the course of the court case, Megha was able to successfully prove that Comfoam’s mattress cover designs were similar to that of Megha’s mattress cover design.

However, in the present case, Megha contended that in total disregard of the consent judgment, Comfoam has continued to manufacture the mattresses using covers similar to its own. Megha further pointed out that an interim order issued by court on 08.07.14 restraining Comfoam from continued passing off of its mattresses as those of Megha had been disregarded hence its prayer that Comfoam be found in contempt of court. In its defence, Comfoam admitted that parties reached a settlement and entered a consent judgment and in obedience to the judgment immediately stopped manufacturing the offending mattresses, changed their designs and registered Trade Marks on them and are lawfully producing mattresses with their covers under the lawfully registered trademarks and are therefore not in contempt of court orders. Comfoam argued that the order did not prohibit them from manufacturing mattresses per se but prohibited them from manufacturing or selling or passing off its mattresses as those of Megha.

In arriving at its finding that Comfoam were in contempt of court orders, the court observed that the mattresses covers by Comfoam were very similar to those of Megha in design and color and the only difference is that Comfoam’s covers bore its own company name. The court’s ultimate decision was as follows:

The application is allowed for all the reasons set out herein and the following orders are made:-

1. A suspended sentence of six months committal is to be meted out to the Directors of the Respondent Company, if the acts that were forbidden by court in the consent order persist.

2. Exemplary damages of shs. 300,000,000/- are awarded to the Applicant Company with payment of interest at court rate from date of this ruling till payment in full.

3. The sum of shs. 100,000,000/- is awarded against the Respondent as a penalty for contempt of court orders in Civil Suit 269/2011. The sum is to be deposited in court.

4. The mattresses with the infringing cover design shall be removed from the market for destruction with the assistance of police following the procedures set out in the Trade Marks Act, upon failure of which a writ of sequestration will issue.

5. Taxed cost of the application are also granted to the Applicant.

A copy of the full judgment is available here.