#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 22/06

  • Confédération Africaine de Football cries foul over infringement of World Cup broadcast rights [Official]
  • Celebrating Twenty Years of the WIPO Academy [Yup Its a Big Deal]
  • ARIPO IP Roving Seminar Meets Academic Institutions in Namibia [Official]
  • Engineering seeds: implications for African farmers [Pambazuka]
  • The problem with simply growing more tech hubs in Africa [Quartz]
  • Zimbabwe set to launch its National IP Policy and Strategy [Chronicle]
  • The cost of changing a country’s name: Swaziland is now the Kingdom of eSwatini [Kudos Afro Leo]
  • Uganda Farmers Working on Geographical Indication for Coffee [Observer]
  • Senegal: Akon wants to build ‘real-life Wakanda’ using a cryptocurrency called AKoin [Stay Tuned]
  • South African Portfolio Committee on Trade and Industry Debates a General Copyright Exception [infojustice]
  • Nigeria: Need to address serious flaws in Patents and Designs Act [DailyTrust]
  • Kenya: Watch out for fakes on virtual shopping sites [Captain Obvious]

 

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other intellectual property-related items that you may come across.

Have a great week-end!

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Anti-Counterfeit Agency Insults Intelligence of Stakeholders at ‘Consultative Forum’ on Proposed IP Law

Anti-Counterfeit Agency Stakeholders Consultative Forum COFEK Invitation 2018 June

Seriously, if you’re a stakeholder of Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA), you should be very concerned about some of the dangerous signs that were on full display during the ACA ‘Stakeholders Consultative Forum on the Proposed Amendments of the Anti-Counterfeit Act, 2018: Towards Improving Service Delivery of the Big 4 Agenda’ held on 13 June 2018 at Boma Inn Hotel, Nairobi. These proposed legislative changes have been previously discussed on this blog here, here, here and here.

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Legal Fraternity Slams ACA on Proposed Amendments to Anti-Counterfeit Act

ACA Anti-Counterfeit Agency Kenya LOGO

In a recent article in the Business Daily titled: ‘Proposed law on counterfeits will hurt businesses’, the foremost intellectual property (IP) law practitioner in the country, William Maema, has faulted Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA) on its proposed amendments to Anti-Counterfeit Act previously discussed on this blog here, here and here. In his hard-hitting article, Maema notes:

‘Apart from the vainglorious step of christening the Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA) by renaming it the Anti-Counterfeit Authority ostensibly to raise its profile to that of premier parastatals such as the Kenya Revenue Authority, Kenya Airports Authority and Communications Authority of Kenya, the new proposals achieve little else that is praiseworthy. ‘

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For Your Own Protection: Why Proposed Anti-Counterfeit Act Amendments Make Sense

Nairobi-Fashion-Hub-Disconnect-Movie_1

The word ‘Disconnect’ (see caption image above) may be the title of the latest Kenyan blockbuster film but it also embodies the current raging debate over proposed changes to The Anti-Counterfeit Act No. 13 of 2008. In our previous blogposts here and here, we have largely dwelt on the demerits of the proposals contained in the Statute Law (Miscellaneous Amendments) Bill 2018, which if enacted, would radically affect intellectual property (IP) enforcement in Kenya, principally undertaken by Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA).

Meanwhile, some readers of this blog, who happen to be IP practitioners specialising in brand enforcement and anti-counterfeiting matters, have rightly pointed out that it is equally important to consider the merits of and benefits expected from the proposed changes to the Act if and when the omnibus Bill is enacted. In particular, this blogpost will focus on the proposals relating to offences and the ‘recordation’ requirements.

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Anti-Counterfeit Agency Eats Humble Pie as Fake Appointment of Board Chairman Struck Down After Judicial Review

anti-counterfeit-agency-aca-chairman-polycarp-igathe-speaking-at-world-anti-counterfeit-day-wacd-2015-event-in-mombasa-kenya

“Whereas the President had the power to appoint the Chairman of the Anti-Counterfeit Agency, that appointment had to be in compliance with the Constitution and the relevant Legislation since, as I have stated herein above, the President in undertaking his executive functions does so on behalf of the people of the Republic of Kenya and has to bow to the will of Kenyans as expressed in their document delegating their sovereign powers to inter alia the executive, the Constitution. It is the Constitution which sets out the terms under which the delegated sovereign power is to be exercised and those to whom the power is delegated must adhere to it…” – Excerpt from the Judgment by Mr. Justice G.V. Odunga on December 16th 2015.

Towards the end of December 2015, the High Court, in one of its boldest judgments yet, struck down President Kenyatta’s appointment of Polycarp Igathe as Chairman of the Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA). Last month, the Cabinet Secretary for Industrialisation and Entreprise Development responded to the High Court judgment by (re-)appointing Igathe as ACA Chairman vide Gazette Notice No. 368 published on January 22nd 2016.

**Update (08/02/16): This blogger has been reliably informed that the above (re-)appointment of Igathe by the Cabinet Secretary has been challenged and an order of stay has been issued by the High Court. More details to follow.

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Kenafric ‘Fuma’ Footwear Denies Counterfeiting Claims by Puma

Kenafric Fuma Footwear

This blogger has previously blogged here and here about Kenafric’s fatal attraction to well-known trade marks, to put it mildly. The latest victim of Kenafric’s attraction is none other than Puma AG Rudolf Dassler Sport (Puma for short). In this connection, this blogger came across a recent ruling in the case of Kenafric Industries Limited & another v Anti-Counterfeit Agency & 3 others [2015] eKLR.

In this case, Puma through its representative Paul Ramara lodged complaints at Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA) against Kenafric for trade mark infringement. ACA and Ramara went to Kenafric’s premises and demanded to check the same for goods in the name of Puma a demand Mikul Shah a director at Kenafric declined to comply with due to the fact that his company had not been served with any Court order directing the said search and entry. Consequently, Shah was arrested, taken to Ruaraka Police Station and charged with the offence of obstruction and released on bond.

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Intersections between Intellectual Property, Consumer Protection and Competition Law in Kenya

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Editor’s note: This article is a commentary on the LSK CLE on Competition and Consumer Law on Feb 8, 2014 at the Hilton, Nairobi. Audio recordings of the various presentations made during the CLE have been uploaded here.

From an intellectual property (IP) perspective, the enactments of the Competition Act, 2010 and the Consumer Protection Act, 2012 have played a major role in balancing the interests of IP owners and IP users in Kenya. The Competition Act is a broad piece of legislation as it seeks to promote and safeguard competition in the economy whilst protecting consumer rights. The Consumer Protection Act was enacted with a view to consolidate various consumer protection provisions scattered in several pieces of legislation. In this regard, the 2012 Act governs the protection of the consumer and aims to prevent unfair trade practices in consumer transactions.

In this discussion of how IP intersects with consumer protection law and competition law, the point of departure is the Constitution of Kenya, 2010. The rights of the various categories of IP rights holders are guaranteed under Article 11, 40 and 69 of the Constitution, whereas the rights of IP rights licensees as users are guaranteed under Article 46 of the Constitution.

However it is important to note that, under Article 24 of the Constitution, none of these rights enshrined in the Bill of Rights are absolute in nature. This Article provides that a right in the Bill of Rights can be limited by law where that limitation is reasonable and justifiable in an open and democratic society, taking into account certain factors relating to the nature, extent, importance and purpose of the limitation.

In this connection, it is submitted that the Competition and Consumer Protection Acts introduce several limitations to the rights of IP owners, discussed below.

In the Competition Act, restrictive trade practices are defined to include any agreement, decision or concerted practice which amounts to the use of an intellectual property in a manner that goes beyond the limits of legal protection. However the Act provides for the grant of exemption for certain restrictive practices in respect of intellectual property rights. This blogger wonder whether de jure monopolies such as collective management organisations would be required to apply and obtain such exemptions.

In addition, the Act defines the abuse of dominant position to include abuse of an intellectual property right. This latter point is discussed by Guserwa, SC at 4:37 in the audio recording below, labelled: “Competition Law Issues in the Legal Profession”.

With regard to the provisions on extra-territorial operation and mergers in the Act, it is important to note the use of the word “asset” which is defined in section 2 as follows:

” “asset” includes any real or personal property, whether tangible or
intangible, intellectual property, goodwill, chose in action, right, licence, cause
of action or claim and any other asset having a commercial value;”

Another important section of the Act is part VI which deals with consumer welfare. This blogger submits that these consumer welfare provisions may have the effect of limiting some of the rights enjoyed by IP owners. These provisions are further enhanced by the Consumer Protection Act. Therefore it is noteworthy that the provisions in the Competition Act relating to false or misleading representations and unconscionable conduct are covered in the provisions relating to unfair practices under the Consumer Protection Act.

From an IP perspective, the consumer law provisions in these two Acts interact with IP at both international and national levels. At the international level, these consumer law provisions give effect to Kenya’s obligations under the Article 10bis of the Paris Convention. These obligations are reinforced by Article 2 of the TRIPs Agreement. At the national level, these consumer law provisions give effect to three IP legislations, namely the Copyright Act, the Trade Marks Act and the Anti-Counterfeit Act. In this context, this blogger argues that the definition of “supplier” in the Consumer Protection Act is broadly defined such that it includes owners of IP rights. Therefore the obligations and duties imposed on suppliers can therefore be extended to IP owners in their normal course of trade.