The New Face of Creative Commons in Kenya

Elizabeth Oyange By Rori! Comics for UnCommon Women, CC BY

The inaugural meeting of the Creative Commons (CC) Kenya Chapter was held on 25 July 2018. This meeting marked the transition of the CC community in Kenya into a CC Country Chapter. A key agenda item was the election of several officials to manage the affairs of the CC Kenya Chapter. As readers of this blog may know, the Creative Commons community in Kenya was previously organised using an ‘Affiliate’ model with two Leads, a Public Lead (based at CIPIT – Strathmore University) and a Legal Lead (based Kenya Law i.e. National Council for Law Reporting).

Under the new structure, the Creative Commons Global Network (CCGN) co-ordinates and provides leadership in the global CC movement. The Global Network Council (GNC) is the governing and decision-making body of the CCGN. It consists of elected representatives of all CC Country Chapters and representatives from CC HQ. CC Chapters serve as the central coordinators of the work of the individuals and institutions participating within a country in support of the CCGN. As such, all those interested in becoming members of CC must register here either as Network Members or Network Partners (for Institutions) and belong to a Country Chapter.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Behold, The Inter-Agency Anti-Illicit Trade Executive Forum and Technical Working Group

Kenya Gazette July 2018 Inter-Agency Anti-Illicit Trade Executive Forum and Technical Working Group Ministry Industry Trade

The recently formed Inter-Agency Anti-Illicit Trade clique sounds like it could have been a WhatsApp group. In last Friday’s Kenya Gazette, the Minister at the time announced the establishment and appointment of both an Inter-Agency Anti-Illicit Trade Executive Forum (23 members in total) and an Inter-Agency Anti-Illicit Trade Technical Working Group (24 members in total). The Executive Forum and Technical Working Group are apparently expected to deliver on the President’s Big 4 Agenda pillar of enhancing manufacturing so that the sector contributes 15% to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 9.2% in 2016.

Continue reading

Join Creative Commons Kenya Chapter: Meet-up This Friday 29/06 at CJ’s

CJ's Trip Moran DbIDeZ4XkAEtOQp

This Friday 29th June 08:00-09:00am you are all invited for an informal meet-up to discuss formally setting up the Creative Commons (CC) community in Kenya as a CC Chapter. As some may know, the CC Global Network is going through a restructuring process and the reorganisation of country teams into chapters is a part of this process. As such, CC would like to invite everyone interested to join this process. To this end, CC HQ has put together a toolkit to guide country teams through the process of setting up a chapter.

In the meantime, you are all invited to formally register as members of the CC Global Network by signing up at http://network.creativecommons.org.

Finally, feel free to connect on the CC Kenya WhatsApp group which you can join through this link: https://chat.whatsapp.com/4Eyf9KDh8Mq7dh5veOh7sn

Publicly Funded Intellectual Property: Why Kenya Needs a Bayh-Dole Law and Lessons from South Africa

science kenya hiv

“Every Kenyan is an inventor.” – Anon.

With the enactment of the Science, Technology and Innovation (ST&I) Act 2013 (discussed by this blogger here), it is imperative that the central government legislates on the management of intellectual property (IP) emanating from publicly financed research and development (R&D). Such legislation would ensure that IP from publicly funded R&D is commercialized for the benefit of all Kenyans in line with the State’s IP mandate under Article 40(5) of the Constitution. This is also consistent with an increasing awareness in Kenya of IP as an instrument for wealth creation.

In the context of publicly funded research, institutions such as universities can be encouraged through an enabling legal framework to protect and commercialise the fruits of their research. Such a legal framework would, among other things, clearly delineate the rights and obligations of the public funders and the researchers. In support of such legislation, this blogger submits that Kenya’s IP legal framework must reflect a manifest desire to transition from a resources-based economy to a knowledge-driven economy.

Read the rest of this article here.