Kenyan Company Seeks to Stop Barclays ABSA Bank Rebrand in Trade Mark Suit

Barclays Bank rebrand ABSA Group Africa Kenya Daily Nation March 2018

In the recent High Court case of ABSA Kenya Limited v Barclays Bank of Kenya [2018] eKLR, a Kenyan company has failed to temporarily halt the proposed name change of Barclays Bank to Absa. ABSA Kenya claimed that it had received cancellation of lucrative transactions due to confusion created by the planned rebranding by Barclays Bank. However the learned judge in this case dismissed the plaintiff’s application for interim injunction to ‘restrain Barclays from using, representing, infringing, advertising or in any manner whatever the trade mark and the name ABSA or its derivatives, deductives, corollaries devices and/or anxilliaries in Kenya or in any other place or at all.’

Continue reading

High Court Allows Parallel Importation of Durex Trade Mark Products in Kenya

durex products 1272521804532_hz_cnmyalibaba_web2_24004

In a recently reported ruling in the case of LRC Products Limited v Metro Pharmaceuticals Limited [2016] eKLR, the High Court dismissed an application by the plaintiff for an injunction restraining the defendant from importing, packaging, supplying, selling or offering for sell, distributing or otherwise dealing with the ‘Durex” products. The plaintiff had also sought orders to enter into the Defendant’s premises and seize all products or packaged products bearing the Plaintiff’s trademark, or similar trademark and further, seize records of purchases and sales, invoices and any other documents which constitute or would constitute evidence necessary to substantiate its cause of action.

As a result of this ruling, a trade mark will not be infringed by the importation into or distribution, sale or offering for sale, in Kenya of goods to which the trade mark has been applied by or with the consent of the proprietor.

Continue reading

High Court Upholds Registrar’s Decision to Expunge “KENYA BOYS CHOIR” Trade Mark

kenya boys choir trade mark high court milimani nairobi judgment case 2016 photo by henry wanjala

“The appellant cannot have been credited for singing and performing well, as a choir. He was not the choir. He was the Director, the Conductor or the Instructor. Therefore, when the prowess of the Appellant was recognised for the tasks he had excelled in, that did not, and could not transfer to the Appellant, the intellectual property which vested in the choir.” – Mr. Justice Fred A. Ochieng, Misc. Cause No. 193/2015 Joseph Muyale Inzai v Henry Wanjala, Sylvester Matete Makobi, Cliff Njora Njuguna,Masambaya Fredrick Ndukwe And Geoffrey Sauke Together T/A Kenya Boys Choir & another [2016]

In a recent judgment, the High Court has upheld the ruling of the Registrar of Trade Marks to expunge Trade Mark No. KE/T/2010/67586 “KENYA BOYS CHOIR” (WORDS) in Classes 16 and 41 in the name of Joseph Muyale Inzai. From previous posts here and here, readers will recall that members of Kenyan Boys Choir filed an application with the Registrar for expungement of the mark claiming that they were aggrieved by its entry in the Register for various reasons. The Registrar ruled in favour of the Choir members and found that Inzai had no valid and legal claim to the mark for the reason that his ownership of the mark was not sufficiently substantiated as required by law. Inzai felt aggrieved by the Registrar’s ruling and moved to the High Court on an appeal. This blogpost is in relation to the High Court judgment in that appeal.

Continue reading

Pay TV Disputes Copyright in Free-to-Air Broadcast: Appeal Case of Wananchi Group Uganda v. New Vision

Robert Kabushenga New Vision CEO Bukedde TV Zuku

This blogger has come across a recent ruling by Uganda’s Court of Appeal in the case of Wananchi Group (U) Ltd v. The New Vision Printing & Publishing Co. Ltd. The background of this case is as follows: New Vision had filed an application against Wananchi in the High Court for a temporary injunction seeking to restrain the Wananchi from further infringement of the New Vision’s copyright in the production, air transmission or broadcast of “Bukedde Television” through Wananchi’s Zuku Television.

In the High Court, New Vision contended that Wananchi continued to infringe on the New Vision’s copyright by retransmitting Bukedde TV for private benefit and for personal economic gain without the consent or licence of the owner despite express warning. The High Court agreed with New Vision and granted the order of a temporary injunction. This brings us to the present case of Wananchi’s application in Court of Appeal for an interim order of stay of execution of the order of the lower court.

Continue reading

Blind Opposition to Caller Ringtone Deal between Safaricom and Collecting Societies: High Court Case of Irene Mutisya & Anor v. MCSK & Anor

Robert Collymore CEO Safaricom

This blogger has recently come across Nairobi High Court Civil Case No. 262 of 2015 Irene Mutisya & Anor v. Music Copyright Society of Kenya & Anor. In this case Mutisya and another copyright owner Masivo have filed suit against Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) and mobile network operator Safaricom Limited for copyright infringement. The copyright owners filed an urgent application on 30th July 2015 for a temporary injunction to restrain Safaricom from remitting license fees to MCSK pursuant to a recently concluded license agreement for caller ring-back tones (CRBT) made available through Safaricom’s Skiza platform. The copyright owners also asked the court to restrain both Safaricom and MCSK from implementing the CRBT License Agreement pending the hearing of the application.

Continue reading

Legality of Equitable Remuneration Challenged: High Court Petition of Xpedia & 4 Ors v. Attorney General & 4 Ors

equitable remuneration

Editor’s Note: On 31st July 2015, the urgent application in this Petition No.317 of 2015 dated 29th July 2015 was heard and certain interim orders were granted. A copy of the orders is available here.

This blogger has confirmed a recent media report that two content service providers and three copyright owners have jointly filed a petition challenging the constitutionality of the right to equitable remuneration under the now infamous section 30A of the Copyright Act. The Petition was filed against the Attorney General, Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO), Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP), Performers Rights Society of Kenya (PRiSK) and Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK).

As stated above, the crux of the Petition filed by Xpedia Management Limited, Liberty Afrika Technologies Limited, Elijah Mira, Francis Jumba and Carolyne Ndiba is that KAMP, PRiSK and MCSK should be stopped by the court from receiving or collecting royalties under section 30A of the Copyright Act in respect of works owned or claimed by the Petitioners.

Continue reading