#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 17/08

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“M1L3L3” is “MILELE”, a Swahili word which means “Forever”

  • Call for Articles – African Journal of Intellectual Property [Deadline Next Month]
  • Respect for IP – Growing from the Tip of Africa: International Conference [Registration Open]
  • Video: Using blockchain to prevent counterfeit drugs in Kenya [IBM Research]
  • The African music industry is gaining global interest [Axios]
  • Encourage imitation to boost creativity in Kenya [Captain Obvious]
  • Why India’s IP policy needs a South African tweak [The Hindu]
  • Adeokin v. MCSN: No CMO licence required for an exclusive licensee of copyright to enforce its licence [The 1709 Blog]
  • In Case You Missed It: Kenya Patent Office is Publishing List of Expired KE Patents [Big 4 Agenda]
  • South Africa: Department of Trade and Industry Film Incentive [DTI]
  • The New Face of Creative Commons in Kenya [Shameless Plug]
  • South Africa: IP Management and the Commercialization of Publicly Funded Research Outcomes [WIPO]
  • Kenya: Request for Comments on the Proposed Privacy and Data Protection Policy and Bill, 2018 [Deadline Next Month]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other IP/ICT-related items that you may come across.
Have a great week-end!

Fire in the Sky: Law Society Shamelessly Remains Mum in Copyright Claim

‘Fire in the Sky’ (pictured above) is a stunning photograph of Nairobi’s skyline lit up against the backdrop of New Years’ fireworks. In April 2018, this work by Reinhard Mue aka Rey Matata was unlawfully copied and used by Law Society of Kenya (LSK). In June 2018, Reinhard wrote to LSK complaining about infringement of the rights to his copyright work and threatened to take legal action. To-date, LSK and its elected leaders have failed to respond to Reinhard at all, either formally or otherwise. As a member of LSK, this blogger is disappointed that the LSK leadership has allowed such a straight-forward matter to become a public spectacle.

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How A Typo Cost Safaricom the “OKOA STIMA” Trade Mark in Favour of Colour Planet

okoa stima safaricom colour planet trademark case

Recently, a leading newspaper published a story here stating that Safaricom Limited had obtained interlocutory orders against Colour Planet Limited stating that the latter was “forbidden from interfering with any contracts Safaricom has under the banner Okoa Stima, suggesting to any third party that Safaricom does not have the right to use the name Okoa Stima.” The rest of the story is filled with several contradictory and confusing facts regarding trade mark searches made, trade mark applications filed and trade mark registrations with respect to the Okoa Stima mark by both Safaricom and Colour Planet.

This blogpost is intended to set the record straight on the specific issue of the chronology of events at the Trade Mark Registry of Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI) involving both Colour Planet and Safaricom between March 2015 and January 2016. For intellectual property (IP) practitioners, this post may also serve as a cautionary tale on the importance of care and caution when handling your clients’ matters pending before KIPI.

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Law Society Publishes Article Plagiarised by Law Professor: Copyright Issues in Wachira Maina v. PLO Lumumba Dispute

cover of the law society of kenya journal volume 11 2015 number 1 lawafrica

This week, constitutional lawyer Wachira Maina took to his facebook page to express his outrage that his work had been plagiarised by a senior lawyer and professor of law, PLO Lumumba. He begins his lengthy post on social media as follows:

“I am aghast. Prof. Lumumba has gone ahead and blatantly plagiarised my April 20th 2013 article on the Presidential Election and re-published it with the grandiloquent title “From Jurisprudence To Poliprudence: The Kenyan Presidential Election Petition, 2013” in the current issue of the Law Society of Kenya Journal.”

In the comments section, Maina discloses that he has already retained legal representation and that his counsel has written to Lumumba over the issue. For intellectual property (IP) enthusiasts, this blogger reckons that if this dispute ends up before the courts, there will be a number of interesting copyright law questions to be addressed.

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