#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 27/07

CISAC AFRICA COMMITTEE REGION 2018 DjGrq71XsAA8DYh

  • Improving creators’ royalty collections in Africa: CMOs gather in Abidjan for CISAC’s Africa Committee [Official]
  • Figures of the week: Africa’s energy innovation landscape [Brookings]
  • 5th Global Congress on IP and the Public Interest, Sept 27-29 Washington DC [Register Now]
  • Nigeria announces national airline, didn’t register domain names [iAfrikan]
  • South Africa’s Proposed Copyright Fair Use Right Should Be A Model For The World [InfoJustice]
  • Kenya: MCSK asks MPAKE to stop collecting royalties [Pot Calling Kettle]
  • Africa Has an ‘Uber’ Opportunity to Disrupt Farming Technology [AGRA]
  • Poor e-commerce policies slow the uptake in Africa [The Star]
  • How broke public universities can change fortunes [Captain Obvious]
  • Does the fourth industrial revolution call for a sui generis form of IP protection? [A+ Bunch of Lawyers]
  • Comesa to set up team on digital free trade area [East African]
  • Time for a Sui Generis Technology Importation Right? [Afro-IP]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other intellectual property-related items that you may come across.

Have a great week-end!

The New Face of Creative Commons in Kenya

Elizabeth Oyange By Rori! Comics for UnCommon Women, CC BY

The inaugural meeting of the Creative Commons (CC) Kenya Chapter was held on 25 July 2018. This meeting marked the transition of the CC community in Kenya into a CC Country Chapter. A key agenda item was the election of several officials to manage the affairs of the CC Kenya Chapter. As readers of this blog may know, the Creative Commons community in Kenya was previously organised using an ‘Affiliate’ model with two Leads, a Public Lead (based at CIPIT – Strathmore University) and a Legal Lead (based Kenya Law i.e. National Council for Law Reporting).

Under the new structure, the Creative Commons Global Network (CCGN) co-ordinates and provides leadership in the global CC movement. The Global Network Council (GNC) is the governing and decision-making body of the CCGN. It consists of elected representatives of all CC Country Chapters and representatives from CC HQ. CC Chapters serve as the central coordinators of the work of the individuals and institutions participating within a country in support of the CCGN. As such, all those interested in becoming members of CC must register here either as Network Members or Network Partners (for Institutions) and belong to a Country Chapter.

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Join Creative Commons Kenya Chapter: Meet-up This Friday 29/06 at CJ’s

CJ's Trip Moran DbIDeZ4XkAEtOQp

This Friday 29th June 08:00-09:00am you are all invited for an informal meet-up to discuss formally setting up the Creative Commons (CC) community in Kenya as a CC Chapter. As some may know, the CC Global Network is going through a restructuring process and the reorganisation of country teams into chapters is a part of this process. As such, CC would like to invite everyone interested to join this process. To this end, CC HQ has put together a toolkit to guide country teams through the process of setting up a chapter.

In the meantime, you are all invited to formally register as members of the CC Global Network by signing up at http://network.creativecommons.org.

Finally, feel free to connect on the CC Kenya WhatsApp group which you can join through this link: https://chat.whatsapp.com/4Eyf9KDh8Mq7dh5veOh7sn

Blind Opposition to Caller Ringtone Deal between Safaricom and Collecting Societies: High Court Case of Irene Mutisya & Anor v. MCSK & Anor

Robert Collymore CEO Safaricom

This blogger has recently come across Nairobi High Court Civil Case No. 262 of 2015 Irene Mutisya & Anor v. Music Copyright Society of Kenya & Anor. In this case Mutisya and another copyright owner Masivo have filed suit against Music Copyright Society of Kenya (MCSK) and mobile network operator Safaricom Limited for copyright infringement. The copyright owners filed an urgent application on 30th July 2015 for a temporary injunction to restrain Safaricom from remitting license fees to MCSK pursuant to a recently concluded license agreement for caller ring-back tones (CRBT) made available through Safaricom’s Skiza platform. The copyright owners also asked the court to restrain both Safaricom and MCSK from implementing the CRBT License Agreement pending the hearing of the application.

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The Jubilee Government – One Year Later: Waiting for the Intellectual Property Organisation of Kenya

gado editorial cartoon April 10 2014 daily nation

As many readers may know, the Jubilee government of President Uhuru Kenyatta, his Deputy William Ruto and his Cabinet mark the end of their first year in office this month. To this end, Gado’s comic in today’s Daily Nation newspaper depicts Kenyatta and Ruto being accused of copyright infringement by the immediate former president Kibaki. The message is clear: the Jubilee government is literally singing the same tune as the previous government.

As this blogger has previously noted, Kenyatta has been very supportive of the creative economy and has on several occasions reiterated his administration’s commitment to creating a conducive environment for creators to reap from their intellectual property (IP) assets. However, Kenyatta’s lasting mark on IP in the past year was the decision to reform all state corporations and parastatals in Kenya which has set in motion plans to merge the copyright office, the industrial property office and the anti-counterfeit agency into one national IP office. (See this blogger’s comments on the merger here and here).

According to recent media reports, the heads of the various government parastatals spent the month of March at the Kenya School of Government deliberating and making recommendations to the Jubilee Government on the best ways to merge the various state agencies across the various sectors, including intellectual property administration and enforcement. Unconfirmed whispers received by this blogger indicate that the proposed name for the new IP body is the Intellectual Property Organisation of Kenya (IPOK) which will be composed of three directorates (Copyright and Related Rights, Industrial Property and Anti-Counterfeit). This new body, IPOK, will be run by a Director-General, much like the African Regional Intellectual Property Organisation (ARIPO) or the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

Regardless of the new IP body’s format, it is clear that members of the Jubilee Cabinet will play a crucial role to ensure that this body functions smoothly and delivers on the expectations of Kenyans. In particular, the Cabinet Secretaries in charge of Industrialisation, Justice and Culture will play the greatest role to midwife and steer the operationalisation of the proposed IP body. In a recent publication titled “Cabinet Scorecard”, the Star newspaper used the following rating to gauge the performance of the Jubilee Cabinet over the past year:

“A. You are doing an excellent job

B. Good, but room for improvement

C. You are okay

D. Get your act together

E. Resign

F. Please fire him, Mr President”

According to the Star, no member of the Executive obtained an “A” grade with Kenyatta being the highest scorer with a “B” grade. The Cabinet Secretary for Industrialisation, Adan Mohammed was among the lowest scorers with a “D” grade.

The scorecard reads in part:

“A year later, no one can say with certainty whether he [Mohammed] has done anything let alone inspire change. Nothing much has been heard of his ministry and nothing has reverberated on the ground from the golden touch everyone expected from him…It is no surprising therefore that in the ministry’s website, only three events appear in the “news and events” category one year later.”

Many will recall that Mohammed’s docket is the parent ministry for two out of the three IP agencies to be merged, namely the Kenya Industrial Property Institute (KIPI) and the Anti-Counterfeit Agency (ACA). Furthermore, it is widely speculated that the Industrialisation Ministry may be charged with direct oversight and supervision over the new IP body.

As the Jubilee government enters the second year of its administration, this blogger will continue to review the highs and lows of the Executive, including the current national IP offices, in promoting, supporting and protection the IP rights of the Kenyans.

High Court Orders Government to Facilitate Copyright Tribunal in PERAK Case against KAMP and PRiSK

pub kenya perak

In a judgment delivered recently, the High Court in the case of Republic v Kenya Association of Music Producers (KAMP) & 3 others Ex- Parte Pubs, Entertainment and Restaurants Association of Kenya (PERAK) [2014] eKLR has ordered the State to set up the Competent Authority established under the Copyright Act to hear and determine the dispute between PERAK and the related rights collective management organisations KAMP and PRiSK with respect to the latter’s tariffs for communication to the public.

As many may know, the Pubs, Entertainment and Restaurants Association of Kenya (PERAK) is the largest single entity representing owners and managers of the major restaurants, pubs and entertainment venues in Kenya. PERAK is registered under the Societies Act as a welfare Organization and its main objective is to bring together operators with a view of resolving common problems in the hospitality industry, developing a code of conduct for its members, engage in social responsibility activities and generally to help members comply with various regulations governing the hospitality industry.

The gist of the PERAK’s judicial review action is summarised in the following three orders which were sought from the court, namely:-

“1. That this Honourable Court be pleased to grant an order of prohibition to prohibit the 1st and 2nd Respondents from arbitrarily imposing and collecting high tariffs/license fees and other levies from the Applicant’s members’ business premises using a wrong tariff structure and generally harassing, intimidating and confiscating their business equipment throughout the Republic of Kenya.
2. That this Honourable Court be pleased to grant an order of mandamus compelling and directing the 3rd and 4th Respondents to hear and determine the dispute between the Applicant and the 1st and 2nd Respondents in relation to the high license fees charged and /or tariffs charged/levied using a wrong tariff structure by the 1st and 2nd Respondents.
3. The costs of this Application be provided for.”

In the court’s judgment, PERAK succeeded to prove that it had locus standi to institute proceedings on behalf of its members in addition to order no. 2. However PERAK was unsuccessful on order no. 1. With respect to order no. 3, the court declined to make any order as to costs.

Comment:

This blogger is surprised by PERAK’s poor form in mounting its judicial review suit against KAMP and PRiSK. This was clearly manifest from several unsubstantiated allegations, inaccurate and outrightly false statements of the provisions of the law by PERAK.

The most significance of this judgment can be found in the last four paragraghs where the court examines whether the government can and should be compelled to give effect to section 48 of the Copyright Act. On numerous occasions (see some examples here, here, here and here) this blogger has emphasised the need for Kenya to immediately operationalise the Competent Authority aka the Copyright Tribunal which is established under the Copyright Act to hear and determine disputes between users and CMOs.

Therefore this blogger is elated that the High Court has seized the opportunity to state clearly that the Government, in particular the Office of the Attorney General and Department of Justice can no longer rely on the same old excuses as reasons for not facilitating the operations of the Competent Authority.

To quote the court:

“The only reason advanced by the Kenya Copyright Board why the Competent Authority cannot fulfil its said statutory duty is that the Competent Authority is yet to be operationalized owing to budgetary and administrative challenges and hence the same is not functional. Article 47(1) of the Constitution provides that every person has the right to administrative action that is expeditious, efficient, lawful, reasonable and procedurally fair. Article 21(1) of the Constitution on the other hand provides that it is a fundamental duty of the State and every State organ to observe, respect, protect, promote and fulfil the rights and fundamental freedoms in the Bill of Rights. It is therefore upon the State to facilitate the Competent Authority so that it can undertake its statutory duties. To fail to do so amounts to abdication of the Constitutional duties imposed upon the State and in applying a provision of the Bill of Rights this Court is enjoined by Article 20(3)(b) of the Constitution to adopt the interpretation that most favours the enforcement of a right or fundamental freedom.
Adopting the said approach, this Court is not satisfied that the reason advanced by the Kenya Copyright Board warrants the state being absolved from the performance of its statutory duties taking into account the fact that the Competent Authority is already in the office.”

The ball is therefore squarely in the government’s court to operationalise the Competent Authority failing with PERAK will be at liberty to return to court for contempt orders against the Kenya Copyright Board.