#ipkenya Weekly Dozen: 17/08

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“M1L3L3” is “MILELE”, a Swahili word which means “Forever”

  • Call for Articles – African Journal of Intellectual Property [Deadline Next Month]
  • Respect for IP – Growing from the Tip of Africa: International Conference [Registration Open]
  • Video: Using blockchain to prevent counterfeit drugs in Kenya [IBM Research]
  • The African music industry is gaining global interest [Axios]
  • Encourage imitation to boost creativity in Kenya [Captain Obvious]
  • Why India’s IP policy needs a South African tweak [The Hindu]
  • Adeokin v. MCSN: No CMO licence required for an exclusive licensee of copyright to enforce its licence [The 1709 Blog]
  • In Case You Missed It: Kenya Patent Office is Publishing List of Expired KE Patents [Big 4 Agenda]
  • South Africa: Department of Trade and Industry Film Incentive [DTI]
  • The New Face of Creative Commons in Kenya [Shameless Plug]
  • South Africa: IP Management and the Commercialization of Publicly Funded Research Outcomes [WIPO]
  • Kenya: Request for Comments on the Proposed Privacy and Data Protection Policy and Bill, 2018 [Deadline Next Month]

For more news stories and developments, please check out #ipkenya on twitter and feel free to share any other IP/ICT-related items that you may come across.
Have a great week-end!

Publicly Funded Intellectual Property: Why Kenya Needs a Bayh-Dole Law and Lessons from South Africa

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“Every Kenyan is an inventor.” – Anon.

With the enactment of the Science, Technology and Innovation (ST&I) Act 2013 (discussed by this blogger here), it is imperative that the central government legislates on the management of intellectual property (IP) emanating from publicly financed research and development (R&D). Such legislation would ensure that IP from publicly funded R&D is commercialized for the benefit of all Kenyans in line with the State’s IP mandate under Article 40(5) of the Constitution. This is also consistent with an increasing awareness in Kenya of IP as an instrument for wealth creation.

In the context of publicly funded research, institutions such as universities can be encouraged through an enabling legal framework to protect and commercialise the fruits of their research. Such a legal framework would, among other things, clearly delineate the rights and obligations of the public funders and the researchers. In support of such legislation, this blogger submits that Kenya’s IP legal framework must reflect a manifest desire to transition from a resources-based economy to a knowledge-driven economy.

Read the rest of this article here.