#ipkenya Weekly Review (18th-25th May, 2014)

gado cartoon anglo fleecing corruption AG

Since our last weekly review, the Minister in charge of Copyright and Related Rights in Kenya namely, the Attorney General has under siege for his alleged involvement in the Anglo Leasing contracts scam. This blogger has the full story here. As always, your comments are invited.

Meanwhile in the intellectual property (IP) world, here are some of the top news and views from Kenya and beyond:-

– OpenAIR presents its findings at WIPO Seminar on Intellectual Property & the Informal Economy [WIPO YouTube]

– Copyright Society of Nigeria signs historic royalty agreement with 400-member umbrella body for broadcasters [COSON]

– No More Substantive Examination of Utility Models in Kenya [AfroIP]

– Hidden Treasure and the New Colonialism: Why South Africa Must Protect Its Intellectual Property [SACSIS]

– Nigeria: Nollywood from an intellectual property perspective [WIPO Magazine]

– Kenya: The Maasai ‘Shuka’ Has Evolved Into A Brand [The Star]

– South African Tech firms can now transfer intellectual property offshore [TechCentral]

– Tanzania: Copyright Society and Revenue Authority devising a banderole system for copyright administration [TZ Daily]

– Nigerian Economy Loses N82 Billion Yearly to Software Piracy – BSA [Daily Independent]

– Kenya: The First Thing We Do, Let’s Kill All The Lawyers [BrainstormKE]

– IP Rights and Digital Content: Kenya’s New Headache [ModelEmployee254]

The Maasai Intellectual Property Initiative: Why Should Others Do Pro-Bono IP Work For Kenya?

AFRICA IP TRUST EVENT 2013 INVITE MAASAI IP INITIATIVE LIGHT YEARS IP

In a recent media report titled: “Maasai elders swap Kenya for Holborn Viaduct”, the global law firm Hogan Lovells has reportedly invited Maasai elders to the United Kingdom (UK) as part of its intellectual property (IP) pro bono work. As the report explains:

The firm has been doing intellectual property (IP) pro bono work, led by partner Sahira Khwaja, to try to secure a trademark for the tribe after the recognisable Maasai image has been used repeatedly used in advertising campaigns without any of the spoils making their way back to the tribe itself.
Lovells is working with Elders from the Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania through charity Light Years IP,  which helps developing country producers win ownership of their intellectual property – should they choose to.

Light Years IP is a non-profit organization dedicated to alleviating poverty by assisting developing country producers gain ownership of their intellectual property and to use the IP to increase their export income and improve the security of that income. The Maasai Intellectual Property Initiative (MIPI) was founded by Light Years IP who designed a 7 point plan and IP strategies for the Maasai to achieve control over their iconic brand.

According to Light Years IP CEO, Ron Layton:

…the Maasai people have not yet decided on trademark ownership or appointment of Hogan Lovells to carry out trademark work. The Maasai elders are visiting London to obtain information to assist their community make such decisions. Above all, Light Years IP seeks for respect to be shown to the Maasai. Hogan Lovells are assisting Light Years IP in a range of work.

Comment:

First off, this blogger is ashamed that Kenya’s leading IP firms would rather religiously ‘network’ at International Trademark Association (INTA) Annual Meetings than take up worthy pro-bono IP matters such as MIPI.

Read the rest of this article on the CIPIT Law Blog here.

EVENT: Unveiling of Proposed Law on Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions in Kenya

On Wednesday 8th May 2013, the Honourable Attorney General Prof. Githu Muigai will officiate the National Stakeholders’ Validation Seminar on the proposed legal framework on Protection of Traditional Knowledge (TK) and Traditional Culture Expressions (TCEs) at the Red Court Hotel, South C, Nairobi from 9:00am to 12:00noon. The legal framework aims to protect holders of TK and TCEs against misappropriation, misuse and unlawful exploitation by third parties for use in pharmaceutical products, therapy, arts and craft, music, design and even works of architecture.

This is a historic achievement for Kenya because it is the first country in the region and Africa, to develop a draft legal framework to validate legislation to protect TK and TCEs. It is also pursuant to Section 11, 40(5) and 69 of the Constitution of Kenya, which requires the State to protect the intellectual property rights of Kenya which includes TK and TCEs. The Kenya Copyright Board recognises that the protection of TK and TCEs is in tandem with Kenya’s “Vision 2030” blue print that aims to move our country to a middle income economy by the year 2030 through wealth creation, increased trade and national development.

Alongside KeCoBo and KIPI, there will be representatives from National Council for Science and Technology (NCST), National Museums of Kenya, State Law Office, ARIPO and WIPO.

Below is the program for the day:

SESSION 1:

0800-0830

Arrival
Registration
Prayer – Dr. Benson Mburu (NCST)

Master of Ceremony/Moderator : Dr. Evans Taracha (National Museums of Kenya)

09:10-09:20

Welcome Remarks:
by Chairman Kenya Copyright Board Mr. Tom Mshindi

Introduction:
by Executive Director KECOBO Dr Marisella Ouma, PhD

09:20-09:30

Overview and Objectives:
by Chairperson Inter-ministerial Expert Working Group, Mrs. Catherine Bunyassi Kahuria

09:30-09:45

Africa Position:
by ARIPO representative from TK Division

09:35-10:00

Opportunities for improvement:
by WIPO representative from TK division

10:00-10:30

Keynote address:
The Hon Attorney General Prof. Githu Muigai

10:30-11:00

Group Photo + Tea Break

SESSION 2:

11:00-11:15

Master of Ceremony/Moderator : Dr. Benson Mburu (NCST)

Presentation of the Draft Bill on Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions, 2013 – Key Highlights:
by KIPI, Mr. Stanely Atsali

11:15-01:00

Thematic Groups/Plenary Discussion/Q&A

01:00–02:00

Lunch

02:00-03:00

Group Discussion

03:00-04:00

Group reports and Recommendations

04:20-04:35

Tea Break

04:35 – 05:00

Closing Ceremony and Vote of Thanks

============

To RSVP, contact KECOBO at info@copyright.go.ke

The intellectual property tale of how Kenya almost lost the Kikoi fabric

Recently, the Standard did a feature titled “How Global Coalition saved Local Fabric” in which it called for pro-active measures and long-term strategies to avert the loss of Kenya’s intellectual property assets to foreign entities.

“The country has seen one of its most indigenous products, Kiondo, snapped by international companies and nobody knows which one is next, whether is Kikoi, Maasai shuka, Akala, Akamba carvings, Gusii soap stones or Nyatiti, an eight stringed plucked musical instrument.” – Standard.

IPKenya has in the past argued for both IP-oriented protection measures (in the short term) and a sui-generis regime (in the middle and long terms) to deal with the issue of Kenya’s traditional knowledge products.

But for those who are not familiar with the Kikoi story in particular, here’s how it went:

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