Proposed Copyright Act Amendments on Liability of Internet Service Providers

kecobo kenya copyright board

In an earlier post here, this blogger discussed a set of draft amendments published by Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) for public comments on the subject of internet service providers (ISPs) and web blocking measures in cases of online copyright infringements in Kenya. Subsequently this blogger discussed here several comments submitted to KECOBO on the draft ISP provisions.

This week, KECOBO has published a revised set of draft amendments on ISP liability available here. KECOBO is once again requesting the public to give comments on these ISP provisions through the email account: publicforum@copyright.go.ke. In this regard, KECOBO has confirmed that it shall convene a consultative public forum on February 11th 2016 at the Auditorium of NHIF Building starting at 8:00am.

This blogpost is a commentary of the key changes in the revised draft ISP provisions from KECOBO.

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Government Invites Public Views on Liability of Online Intermediaries for Copyright Infringement

wapkid sauti sol

In recent media reports here and here, Kenya Copyright Board (KECOBO) reveals that it has proposed draft legal provisions to deal with the liability of internet/online intermediaries. KECOBO Chief Legal Counsel (CLC) has been kind enough to share with this blogger a copy of the proposed draft legal provisions available here. KECOBO CLC has also indicated to this blogger that there are plans underway to hold a public forum in the coming months to discuss the draft provisions and receive comments from the public.

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A Kenyan Perspective of South Africa’s Draft National Policy on Intellectual Property

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As many IP enthusiasts may have heard, South Africa has recently published a Draft National Policy on Intellectual Property (IP) (hereafter the Policy). Within the Kenyan context, this blogger has previously questioned the need for a national IP policy particularly in light of the recognition given to IP in the Constitution. However, for the purposes of this post, the policy provides a good basis for a comparative analysis of the state of IP in both South Africa and Kenya as well as possible recommendations to strengthen IP laws.

In the area of patents, Kenya’s IP office undertakes both formal and substantive examinations of patent applications whereas in South Africa, the Policy recommends the establishment of a substantive of a substantive search and examination of patents to address issue of “weak” vs “strong” patents. The policy’s recommendation to amend South African patent law to include pre-and post-opposition would also be instructive to Kenya.

Read the rest of this article here.